(testing signal)

Tag: physics

Combining Physics and Deep Learning

What are Digital Twins and how do they work?

Photo by Jørgen Håland on Unsplash
Read more...

How Quantum Explains Human Consciousness

Quantum and AI together will answer and explain many other non-matter dimensions including Human Consciousness, The Self

Although I have been hearing these spiritual jargons like “The Consciousness”, “The Self” ( Atman – in Sanskrit language), from my grand parents since my childhood, but due to my ignorance or whatever, I never paid any attention nor did I took any serious attempt to even understand the deeper meaning of those terminologies. Honestly, I kept aside those spiritual items for my retirement life.

Incidentally, few years back while digging into some deeper concepts of quantum physics, somehow I confronted with the so-called “The Self” (The Consciousness or Atman)again somewhere in a book.… Read more...

One of nature’s key constants is much larger in a quantum material

A crucial number that rules the universe goes big in a strange quantum material.

The fine-structure constant is about 10 times its normal value in a type of material called quantum spin ice, physicists calculate in the Sept. 10 Physical Review Letters. The new calculation hints that quantum spin ice could give a glimpse at physics within an alternate universe where the constant is much larger.

With an influence that permeates physics and chemistry, the fine-structure constant sets the strength of interactions between electrically charged particles. Its value, about 1/137, consternates physicists because they can’t explain why it has that value, even though it is necessary for the complex chemistry that is the basis of life (SN: 11/2/16).

Read more...

Researchers: The Universe Simulated Itself Into Existence

Yesterday, we looked at “Untitled Earth Sim 64,” a science fiction comedy based on the idea that Earth is a messed up simulation — created by entities that are in themselves simulations. And maybe their simulators were in turn simulated… And so forth. The problem is, where’s the original? Surprisingly, perhaps, there is a physics theory that offers an answer: The universe simulated itself:

A new hypothesis says the universe self-simulates itself in a “strange loop”. A paper from the Quantum Gravity Research institute proposes there is an underlying panconsciousness. The work looks to unify insight from quantum mechanics with a non-materialistic perspective.

Read more...

AI-Ethics in Engineering

The Bias of Traditional Engineers in AI-based Modeling of Physics — PART 2

Image by Author
Read more...

Discovery of complex oxides via automated experiments and data science – pnas.org

Significance

Automation is accelerating the discovery of useful materials, yet testing even a small fraction of the billions of possible materials for a desired property is beyond the reach of workflows involving resource-intensive property measurements. Due to relationships among composition, structure, and properties, identifying a complex material with one interesting property makes it the proverbial needle in a haystack that merits testing for additional properties. We accelerate materials synthesis and optical characterization by employing physics-aware data science to identify materials for further investigation. With this approach, one does not need high-throughput methods for measuring every material property of interest since a single ultra-high–throughput workflow can guide material selection for other properties, which is a new paradigm for accelerated materials discovery.

Read more...

Columbia University to Launch $25 Million AI-based Climate Modeling Center – HPCwire

“We still have these huge cones of uncertainty,” added deputy director Galen McKinley, a professor of earth and environmental sciences who is based at Lamont-Doherty, part of the Columbia Climate School. “Our goal is to harness data from observations and simulations to better represent the underlying physics, chemistry, and biology of Earth’s climate system. More accurate models will help give us a clearer vision of the future.”

Dealing with massive data requires a modern infrastructure. In collaboration with Google Cloud and Microsoft, Ryan Abernathey, an associate professor of earth and environmental sciences based at Lamont-Doherty, will create a platform to allow researchers to share and analyze data.

Read more...

Columbia to Launch $25 Million AI-based Climate Modeling Center – Columbia University


“We still have these huge cones of uncertainty,” added deputy director Galen McKinley, a professor of earth and environmental sciences who is based at Lamont-Doherty, part of the Columbia Climate School. “Our goal is to harness data from observations and simulations to better represent the underlying physics, chemistry, and biology of Earth’s climate system. More accurate models will help give us a clearer vision of the future.”

Dealing with massive data requires a modern infrastructure. In collaboration with Google Cloud and Microsoft, Ryan Abernathey, an associate professor of earth and environmental sciences based at Lamont-Doherty, will create a platform to allow researchers to share and analyze data.

Read more...

14 ways official reports agreed with “conspiracy theorists” on 9/11

Entrance of the Gaithersburg Campus of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Licensed under Adobe Stock

As part of our season marking the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 “terrorist attacks”, OffG is going to be highlighting some of the research papers and scientific studies done over the years.

These studies have been key in pointing out logical flaws and impossible physics used to support the official narrative.

Our first paper is “Fourteen Points of Agreement with Official Government Reports on the World Trade Center Destruction”, which was first published in 2008.

Authored by five key names in the 9/11 truth movement, Steve Jones, Frank Legge, Kevin Ryan, Anthony Szamboti and James Gourley, this paper collates all the statements from both FEMA and NIST that actually agree with the so-called “conspiracy theorists”, and highlights the holes in the official story.

Read more...

The Standard Model

Built on the quantum physics breakthroughs of the 1920s, the Standard Model of particle physics is, according to the physicist David Tong at the University of Cambridge, the most successful scientific theory in history. But, unlike other revolutionary theories such as evolution by natural selection, heliocentrism or even general relativity, the Standard Model is quite difficult to sum up in brief. And so, no surprise, it’s nowhere near as widely understood. In this animated explainer, Tong does his best to bridge this knowledge gap without skimping on the complexities. With the aid of some nifty visuals, he details how the Standard Model describes the interactions between 12 elementary particles and three fundamental forces, as well as what’s missing from the model, and why it isn’t quite a theory of everything.

Read more...

Cold plasma could transform the sustainable farms of the future

Physicist Stephan Reuter of Polytechnique Montréal spends most days using his expertise in energy and matter to improve medical technologies. Recently though, he stood in a sea of green to consider how a shower of charged particles might affect lettuce.

He had been invited to one of the largest commercial greenhouses in Quebec to help the growers rethink the energy of agriculture. Inside the building, encased by glass walls and covering more ground than four soccer fields, thousands upon thousands of lettuce plants floated on polystyrene mats in a hydroponic, or no-soil, growing system. The crop was nearly ready to be picked, packaged and shipped.

Read more...

Langevin Dynamics

Physics (as always) Enriches

Source of image
Read more...

New ‘vortex beams’ of atoms and molecules are the first of their kind

Like soft serve ice cream, beams of atoms and molecules now come with a swirl.

Scientists already knew how to dish up spiraling beams of light or electrons, known as vortex beams (SN: 1/14/11). Now, the first vortex beams of atoms and molecules are on the menu, researchers report in the Sept. 3 Science.

Vortex beams made of light or electrons have shown promise for making special types of microscope images and for transmitting information using quantum physics (SN: 8/5/15). But vortex beams of larger particles such as atoms or molecules are so new that the possible applications aren’t yet clear, says physicist Sonja Franke-Arnold of the University of Glasgow in Scotland, who was not involved with the research.

Read more...

Detect Lightning Strikes with an Arduino

Lightning is a powerful and seemingly mysterious force of nature, capable of releasing huge amounts of energy over relatively short times and striking almost at random. Lightning obeys the laws of physics just like anything else, though, and with a little bit of technology some of its mysteries can be unraveled. For one, it only takes a small radio receiver to detect lightning strikes, and [mircemk] shows us exactly how to do that.

When lightning flashes, it also lights up an incredibly wide spectrum of radio spectrum as well. This build uses an AM radio built into a small integrated circuit to detect some of those radio waves.

Read more...

How to Analyze Blood Glucose Data with Python Data Science Packages

Read more...

3 Questions with BlackBerry’s Director of Data Science

David Relyea is smart (Bachelor of Science from Caltech and a doctorate in physics from Princeton), and that’s a good thing for the security of our electronic devices. As director of data science at BlackBerry, he’s part of a team at the Irvine-based company that provides organizations with software that uses artificial intelligence to stop cybersecurity threats. This software is now used by all G7 nations, all leading commercial banks and nine of the top 10 automotive manufacturers. We asked him three questions:

What’s the future of cybersecurity?

Today’s cybersecurity threats are vast and incredibly smart, many employing artificial intelligence themselves in a weaponized form.

Read more...

GSoC 2021 with ML4SCI | The NMR Project

Organization description

Project Code Repository

Read more...

The physics behind a tardigrade's lumbering gait

Plump and ponderous, tardigrades earned the nickname “water bears” when scientists first observed the 0.02-inch-long animals’ distinctive lumbering gaits in the 18th century. Their dumpy plod, however, raises the question of why tardigrades evolved to walk at all.

Animals as small and soft as tardigrades seldom have legs and almost never bother walking. For example, round worms of similar size and body type thrash about, slithering their doughy forms over unpredictable substrates. Yet the water bear, a micro-animal so distinct that scientists were forced to assign it to its own phylum, uses eight stubby legs to improbably propel itself through marine and freshwater sediment, across desert dunes, and beneath the soil.

Read more...

Imaging, modelling and machine learning combine to predict risk of sudden cardiac death – Physics World

Imaging, modelling and machine learning combine to predict risk of sudden cardiac death – Physics World

Skip to main content



More

Diagnostic imaging

Discover more from Physics World


Copyright © 2021 by IOP Publishing Ltd and individual contributors

Continue reading: https://physicsworld.com/imaging-modelling-and-machine-learning-combine-to-predict-risk-of-sudden-cardiac-death/

Source: physicsworld.com
Read more...

50 years ago, physicists thought they found the W boson. They hadn’t

The W particle may have been foundScience News, August 21, 1971

Physicists distinguish four different kinds of force by which objects in the universe act upon each other: the strong nuclear force, the weak force, electromagnetism and gravity. The developed theory of particle physics outfits each force with a so-called intermediate particle.… Now, from an abandoned silver mine at Park City, Utah, comes strong evidence of the existence of the weak-force quantum, known as the … W particle.

Update

The “strong evidence” for this W particle, or W boson, fell apart under additional scrutiny. Physicists with CERN near Geneva finally caught the boson about a decade later (SN: 2/5/83, p.

Read more...

Ultimate Volleyball: A 3D physics-based RL environment built using Unity ML-Agents

Train reinforcement learning agents to play Volleyball

Image by Author
Read more...

One-dimensional red phosphorous glows in unexpected ways

Aug 12, 2021

(Nanowerk News) When electrons are confined into very small spaces, they can exhibit unusual electrical, optical and magnetic behaviour. From confining electrons in two-dimensional atomic sheet graphene – a feat that won the Nobel Prize in physics in 2010 – to restricting electrons even further to achieve one-dimensionality, this broad line of research is transforming the landscape of fundamental research and technological advances in physics, chemistry, energy harvesting, information and beyond.

In a study published in Nature Communications (“Giant anisotropic photonics in the 1D van der Waals semiconductor fibrous red phosphorus”), an international team led by Aalto University researchers has now found that fibrous red phosphorous, when electrons are confined in its one-dimensional sub-units, can show large optical responses – that is, the material shows strong photoluminescence under light irradiation.
Read more...